cartoons, chips, cookies, and a doll

When I was a kid, I loved watching cartoons.  That was before the mom had discontinued our home cable TV service, when I was somewhere between 6 – 10 years old.

I loved to watch any kind of cartoons.  The Smurfs, Care Bears, Sheera, He-Man, Rainbow Brite…  I was such a wuss, though, that even Scooby Doo was too scary for me to watch.  So I’d watch it while peeking between my fingers.

The sis and I went to 2 different elementary schools.  The patootey thing was that she came home from school before I did.  So if there was ever anything at all new to eat in our refrigerator or kitchen table, then she had devoured all of it, before I got home.

chips

We never had potato chips in our home.  Bags of any kind of chips I hadn’t ever tasted until I was in my early teen years.

One of our cousins in Korea told the sis that he’d never tasted burgers until he went to college because his mom wouldn’t ever buy it for him or his brother during their entire under-college years.  Hearing that made me really appreciate having been able to eat burgers for the first time during my high school years.

cookies

If we ever got cookies, the mom would buy it for us like once every 3 months.  And it was always the same kind of cookies.  The big canned one that had like 5 different kinds of cookies inside.  The sis and I loved the wafer ones best.  Although the container was labeled as being “family size”, it was gone within 2-3 days.  We devoured it like it was our last prison meal.

Some months ago, it was on the news that due to the sanctions on North Korea, the mandatory cookies that had to be made for another mandatory celebration in that country, did not come out being “tasty” at all, due to their not having enough ingredients to make them to be so.  As soon as I had read the article, it had reminded me of my childhood canned cookies.

a doll

One of the pops’ friends would stop by our home a few times a year.  He’d stop by to chat with the pops while he was running his delivery route.  He drove a big van and one of the items that he had within it was boxes of chocolates.  Once in awhile, he’d hand to the pops a box.  After the dude left, that too, the sis and me devoured within seconds.

That dude will always be in my memory cuz he was the very first person to ever bring a toy doll into our home.  We were in our middle school years then.  He gave it to the pops to give it to us one Christmas.  The thing was, he had only brought 1 doll.  And there were 2 of us.

Note to gift-givers of children:  Please do not give just 1 toy, if there is more than 1 child in the home.  Cuz they might fight to the death over that 1 toy.  Better to give no gift at all.  For reals.

Yeah, here we were, 2 girls in the home, but there were no dolls for us to play with.  I always wondered about that as a kid.  Cuz even when I had watched Little House on the Prairie (when we still had cable TV), even the poor girls in that show got to have at least 1 tattered doll to play with.

k-tune

A few years ago, the fam and I used to enjoy watching a Korean TV program called Immortal Songs on a regular weekly basis, which is a singing competition show, usually featuring classic Korean oldies tunes.  During the show’s “Songs of Hope and Cheer” segment, a trio had appeared to compete on that show’s stage for the very first time.

The 3 ladies called themselves The Barbarettes.  The fam and me loved their performance immensely (see it here).  This is one of their great cover songs, “Be My Baby” by The Ronettes.

 

the ladies in London

Another cover song by ’em is “Mr. Sandman“.

 

 

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “cartoons, chips, cookies, and a doll

  1. mylilplace

    Great post, Sandmoos…you also bring me back to my childhood with your writing. I used to love canned cookies…and I would still eat them although they were stale. I loved all the cartoons you mentioned. I didn’t get to watch them often as they only showed them once in a while where I lived. Thanks for sharing such a great song! 🙂

    Reply
  2. Barbara Grace Lake

    It seems so strange to me that you had never tasted potato chips or hamburgers when you were young. But of course, I never tasted any Korean foods until I was probably in my forties. I’m happy to see that in many instances cultures are assimilating foods from other cultures so that there is not this fear of something different, of tasting different, of looking different.

    Reply
  3. murisopsis

    Hehe! I remember canned cookies! We never got those as they were too expensive. I always thought of them as “rich people’s” cookies. The first time I had one I was so disappointed because it didn’t taste special at all! In fact it was rather tasteless and dry…

    Reply
    1. krcc Post author

      the cookies were unfortunately not american or european. i dont want to say from where, so that i dont offend the folks from that country. although its not a 3rd world country, it is in asia, and they have some dry food products which i often find to taste/appear questionable. but for kids, any cookie is better than no cookie! 🙆

      Reply
  4. buddy71

    burgers…my dad was in the air force and we moved from california to colorado when i was in 6th grade. i cant remember ever having a hamburger until we moved to colorado. my dad took my mom and i to a place that served hamburgers. it was a prequel to mcdonalds. i remember they were extremely tasty and cost .25 cents. the love affair continues to this day. i prefer the basic cheeseburger from mcdonalds as it is the now the nearest thing to keep the memory of my dad alive.

    Reply
  5. theceaselessreaderwrites

    My Dad was in the Army ’til I was 13, and one of the best periods of my youth was living in Seoul when I was in my early teens and before the ’88 Olympics. I enjoy reading about snippets of K-life & K-culture. My daughter, The Girl, is way into K-Pop, and her favorite K-pop band is BTS.

    Reply
  6. ekurie

    Not sad post, real. It’s only sad if it gets the best of us. It didn’t. Great music!

    Reply

shoot yo holla hea

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s